Ian Gregory-SmithInstEAD affiliate Dr Ian Gregory-Smith was invited to provide an overview of his work in the field of sports economics to the Economics society at Lancaster University Management School on 1st November 2017. Ian demonstrated a methodology which allows the inference of productivity in the National Football League (NFL) by analysing injuries to star players. Additionally, discussions were held over the extent and importance of competitive balance in sporting contests and the potential for biased decision making from sports officials.

 

Jenny RobertsInstEAD co-director Jennifer Roberts has written a piece for the Economic Review on the economics of healthcare. The Economic Review (Hodder Press) is a publication aimed at A-level Economics students and the article analyses the complicated system of universal health care provision in the UK using basic economic principles. These pieces aim to illustrate the real world applications of economics and encourage A-level students to go on to further study

 

Jenny RobertsInstEAD co-director Jennifer Roberts was an invited to give a seminar at the University of York on social media use and children’s wellbeing on 8th November 2017. This follows a string of exposure for her paper on the topic, co-authored with InstEAD colleagues, which showed that children who spend more time social networking online feel less happy with their lives, and the effects are worse for girls.

 

Dr Philip Powell, Research Fellow at the Institute for Economic Analysis of Decision-making (InstEAD) presented his work on the impacts of social media use on young people’s wellbeing to a community group of older adults, at the Stephen Hill Methodist Church, Crosspool, Sheffield.

Philip is one of a number of University of Sheffield academics speaking to the group about their research over the next academic year. In his talk he presented an overview of children’s changing media usage and contemporary concerns about social media, as well as the costs and benefits of digital connectivity for children’s emotional wellbeing, and the contemporary political initiatives designed to begin to tackle the problem.
This community outreach activity follows research in which he and a team of Sheffield researchers found that children who spend more time social networking online feel less happy with a number of different aspects of their lives.

 

Dr Philip Powell, Research Fellow in the Institute for Economic Analysis of Decision-making (InstEAD) gave evidence to an inquiry examining the ‘impact of cyberbullying on social media on children and young people’s mental health’ convened by The Children’s Society and Young Minds.

Philip was part a panel that was made up of experts from academia, technology and online safety and children and education specialists who gave evidence to a committee chaired by Alex Chalk, MP for Cheltenham.

He provided expert opinion on the definitions and nature of cyberbullying; the current academic evidence supporting a directional link between increased cyberbullying and negative mental health outcomes, over and above traditional (offline) victimisation; and the role social media has in these processes.

The findings from the inquiry will be published in a report in 2018, which will contain policy recommendations on what more industry should be doing to tackle cyberbullying on social media sites and its associations with mental health.

Dr Powell was invited to give evidence following research that he and a team of Sheffield researchers found that children who spend more time social networking online feel less happy with a number of different aspects of their lives, and that this effect was worse for those who reported having been bullied.

Find out more about the cyberbullying inquiry